Raising Interest Rates: How Record Highs Can Affect You

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Interest rates are on the rise, which is likely to significantly impact your financial wellbeing. Whether you’re a consumer or business owner, it’s essential to understand what raising interest rates means and how you can protect yourself from the adverse effects of increasing interest rates. In this blog post, we’ll explore what interest rates are, why they’re rising, and how they will affect you as an individual. We’ll also provide some tips on safeguarding your finances in the face of these changes.

What Are Interest Rates?

Interest rates are the percentage of a loan charged as interest by the lender. They are typically expressed as an annual percentage rate (APR).

Interest rates are determined by several factors, including inflation, the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy, and global economic conditions. In the United States, the federal funds rate is used as a benchmark for setting other interest rates. This is the rate at which banks lend money to each other overnight. When the federal funds rate goes up, an increase in other interest rates usually follows. This could be things such as credit card rates and mortgage rates.

How Do Interest Rates Work?

When you take out a loan, the interest rate is used to calculate the amount of money that you will be required to pay back in addition to the principal sum. The principal sum is the amount of borrowed money on which interest is charged. The interest rate is the percentage of the principal sum charged as interest. For example, if you borrow $100 at an interest rate of five percent, your interest charges would be $5. When raising rates, the Federal Reserve Board sets a target for the federal funds rate.

The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions lend balances held at the Federal Reserve to other depository institutions overnight. When raising rates, the Board aims to promote a moderate long-term interest rate environment that supports maximum employment and price stability. In general, the higher the interest rate, the more you will have to pay.

The interest rate is determined by a number of factors, including the inflation rate, the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy, and global economic conditions. In the United States, the federal funds rate is used as a benchmark for setting other interest rates. The federal funds rate is the rate at which banks lend money to each other overnight. When the federal funds rate goes up, it’s usually followed by an increase in other interest rates, such as credit card and mortgage rates. If you are interested in further reading about interest rates, visit www.credit.com.

How Are Record High Interest Rates Connected to the Economy?

On June 15, 2022, the Fed raised interest rates by 0.75 percent to combat the stubborn inflation that Americans have been experiencing. This is the largest hike since 1994 and the third this year.

When the economy is growing too quickly, raising interest rates can help slow it down and keep prices from rising too fast. Higher interest rates can slow down economic growth because they make borrowing money more expensive. This can discourage businesses from investing and hiring, and it can also make it harder for consumers to afford big purchases like homes or cars.

The decrease of investment and hiring decreases product demand, which can have a ripple effect on the economy. People stop buying products, businesses may cut back on production, which can lead to layoffs. As more people lose their jobs, they will have less money to spend, and the cycle of decreased demand and economic decline will continue. Learn more about record high interest rates, inflation, and the economy. 

How Do Raising Interest Rates Affect Consumers and Business Owners?

Consumers and business owners will be affected differently by rising interest rates. Consumers with variable rate loans, such as credit cards and home equity lines of credit, will see their monthly payments increase as interest rates go up. Business owners with loans may also see their monthly payments increase. However, they may also benefit from higher interest rates if they have loans with fixed interest rates because they can earn more interest on their savings and investments.

There are a few ways to protect yourself from the adverse effects of increasing interest rates. One way is to consolidate your debt into a single loan with a lower interest rate. Another way is to increase your emergency fund so that you have money set aside to cover unexpected expenses. Finally, you can work with a financial advisor to create a plan to help you work towards your financial goals.

What Does This Mean for the Future of the Economy and Your Financial Wellbeing?

The future of the economy is uncertain. However, it’s important to remember that interest rates are just one factor affecting your financial wellbeing. Having a diversified portfolio and a solid financial plan could help you weather the storms of rising interest rates and continue to pursue your financial goals. 

Raising interest rates will have different effects on consumers and business owners. This being the case, there are ways to protect yourself from the negative impacts by consolidating debt, increasing your emergency fund, or working with a financial advisor. Even though raising interest rates will have an effect on your finances, you should remember to stay diversified and have a solid financial plan to weather any storms in the future.

To prepare for your financial future and get support to stay financially afloat during raising interest rates, reach out to a financial planner at Iron Point Financial. Our advisors are always here to help you make the best decisions for your unique financial situation.

Schedule an appointment today!

Disclosure: A diversified portfolio does not assure a profit or protect against loss in a declining market.

We serve the Grove City, Greenville, Erie, Cranberry Township, and Boardman, OH areas.

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